Last updated: April 18. 2014 5:04PM - 1316 Views
Special to the Enterprise



Harlan County High School Guidance Counselors Scott Shepherd, standing at left, and Stephanie Reynolds, standing at center, assist students in making selections of dual credit classes for the next year.
Harlan County High School Guidance Counselors Scott Shepherd, standing at left, and Stephanie Reynolds, standing at center, assist students in making selections of dual credit classes for the next year.
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Harlan County High School students are finding new dual credit options as they register for next year’s classes.


“I encourage parents to look at this wonderful opportunity on earning college credits while still in high school. The best part is they can do this at a fraction of the cost of taking the classes while in college,” said Harlan County Schools Superintendent Mike Howard. “Please talk to your children about taking advantage of this and substantially jump start their college education.”


Students now have an offering of 42 dual credit hours on-site at HCHS, said Brent Roark, assistant superintendent of instruction.


Additional dual credit classes are offered on the Harlan campus of Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College, he said. Those students are bused from the high school to the SKCTC campus in Harlan daily for a variety of career and industrial classes, also leading to a tremendous jump on their college experience.


Roark said he was excited SKCTC will be adding Introduction to Literature and Elementary Spanish for the 2014-2015 school year at the high school. Also, two four-hour courses in biology (Bio 137 and 139) — anatomy and physiology — will be offered with labs, he said.


“These fit every single medical major,” said Roark, noting students will complete both courses by using only one-period for all three trimesters.


Courses also offered are English 101, History 108 and 109, Math 150 (college algebra), Psychology 110, Communications 180 (basic public speaking), Culinary 100 (introduction to culinary) and Visual Communications 100.


The previous dual credit photography class is being replaced with Humanities 202, Appalachian Studies. This meets cultural studies and humanities requirements at the college level, he said.


“The dual credit program at Harlan County High School affords many of our students the unique opportunity to pursue college hours while still in high school,” said Guidance Counselor Stephanie Reynolds. “The dual credit program is a wonderful opportunity for our students to experience a college level curriculum in conjunction with their high school course load. This program is also an excellent way for students and parents to save money on college courses by taking advantage of drastically reduced tuition rates.”


The exact rate for tuition is pending an anticipated percentage increase from the community college system. However, most of the classes will only cost a $50 processing fee. The tuition classes — half-price of taking the classes on a college campus — is estimated at about $234 per class.


Only dual credit classes taught by the college faculty require payment of the half price tuition. The classes are anatomy, physiology, basic public speaking and Appalachian studies.


The other courses will be taught by high school faculty, requiring only a $50 processing fee.


Roark said he commends the college administration and staff for providing the dual credit opportunities to Harlan County students. “I extend my utmost appreciation to Dr. (Lynn) Moore, Dr. (Wheeler) Conover and Carlton Hughes and all of the SKCTC staff for the support of our students and the dual credit program,” he said.


Roark credits the success of the program at HCHS to Reynolds’ leadership, serving as the school’s dual credit liaison.


“If it wasn’t for her, it would fall apart,” he said. “She makes it happen, getting the classes set up and students enrolled. Both Mrs. Reynolds and Mr. (Scott) Shepherd do an excellent job and are committed to making the dual credit program a success.”


Also, he said, “Our HCHS teachers — Mike Hensley, Scott Pace, Karen Phillips, David Hensley, Johnny Partin, Tina Lawson, Tami Brock, Pat Pate and Mary McCormick — should also be commended as they provide this service to all HCHS students and families with no extra compensation. The dedication and commitment of these teachers make the dual credit program possible.”


For more information on dual credit classes, contact Reynolds or Shepherd at the school.

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